Teddy’s Boys – A Glossary

With the upcoming release of Teddy’s Boys on Kindle Vella, I thought I’d release a glossary, since Teddy and Charlie speak a northern English dialect (Manc) that may not be familiar to readers from other countries (or even other parts of the UK). General British words and phrases are indicated as “British” while words and phrases that are distinctive to Manchester are indicated as “Manc.” 

People from Manchester (Mancunians or Mancs) also use rhyming slang, a dialect that replaces words and phrases with others the original word rhymes with. For example, “stairs” are “apples and pears” in Cockney rhyming slang, so one might say, “I fell down the apples and pears.” I’ve indicated rhyming slang as “RS.” Rhyming slang can be impenetrable to outsiders (it’s meant to be, since it was developed to evade detection by the authorities), it’s highly regional (rhyming slang spoken by a Manc may make no sense to someone from London or Birmingham), and I’ve included it sparingly to give the reader a flavor because it can be so difficult to understand, even in context.

Mancs often shorten Christian names with “az” or “ez” to indicate intimacy and affection. Gary becomes “Gaz,” Charles becomes “Chaz,” etc. It’s more common with men than women, although Teddy’s crew call her “Tedz” and “Tez.”

I’ve also included some places in and around Manchester that have a connotative meaning to Mancunians which would not otherwise be clear to outsiders.

Download the Glossary as a PDF:

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